Detail View

Object Name: 3.5-inch celestial globe
Date: 1552
Inventory Number: 1997-1-2060a
Classification: Globe
Maker: François DeMongenet
died 1592
Cultural Region: France
City of Origin: Vesoul
Dimensions: 16 x 8.5 x 8.5 cm (6 5/16 x 3 3/8 x 3 3/8 in.) globe diam: 8.5 cm (3 3/8 in.)
Materials: wood, paper
Description: The globe is fixed on a black wood stand and possesses no other accessories, like a brass meridian or hour circle, usually found on larger globes. It is made of twelve gores which come from a woodcut. Some characteristics of the celestial mapping are: Antinous was not depicted; Eridanus was depicted as a female; the hounds of Boötes were depicted; and finally the "Notae" or magnitude table of stars was added to the gores.

Two cartouches were engraved: one for the dedicacy, and one for the signature.
Signed: cartouche: ELABORABAT FRANCISCUS DEMONGENET ANNO 1552
Inscribed: cartouche: EXIMIO VIRO D: GABRIELI A TIESBACH
Function: Was used as an astronomical teaching tool and as a prestigious object of collection.

A video with information on the design and use of celestial globes, produced by Museo Galileo, is available on their website here.
Historical Attributes: The celestial mapping (shape and positioning of the constellations) started what is often called the DeMongenet tradition, which lasted until the early seventeenth century (though some celestial globes depicted certain DeMongenet features until the 1650s).
Curatorial Remarks: The gores are almost certainly older than the wood globe and its black stand. It is probable that at a later date (perhaps during the nineteenth century?) the gores were cut out of a book and assembled in their present form.
Related Works: Elly Dekker, "The DeMongenet Tradition in Globe Making," in Globes at Greenwich, ed. Elly Dekker (Oxford: Oxford University Press / Greenwich: National Maritime Museum, 1999), 69-74.
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